Book Review (ARC) || Genuine Fraud

Author: E. Lockhart

Publishing Company: Delacorte Press

Release Year: (ARC) To be published September 5, 2017

Genre(s): YA, realistic fiction, thriller

(Shout out to Penguin Random House, where I received this ARC from!)


Synopsis

From the author of the unforgettable New York Times bestseller We Were Liars comes a masterful new psychological suspense novel—the story of a young woman whose diabolical smarts are her ticket into a charmed life. But how many times can someone reinvent themselves? You be the judge.

Imogen is a runaway heiress, an orphan, a cook, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a social chameleon, and an athlete.
An intense friendship. A disappearance. A murder, or maybe two.
A bad romance, or maybe three.
Blunt objects, disguises, blood, and chocolate. The American dream, superheroes, spies, and villains.
A girl who refuses to give people what they want from her.
A girl who refuses to be the person she once was.

(source)

My Thoughts

Okay, wow! There’s a lot going on in this novel, and I whizzed through it because it was so intriguing. I love psychological thrillers (although I don’t get to read them very much) and this was certainly a good one!

Genuine Fraud begins with our main character, Jule, who we soon learn is extraordinarily good at makeup and accents and just, well, shape-shifting in general. She is definitely the heroine of her own story and she lets us know it straight off the bat. From there the story progresses not chronologically forward but backward. It makes things a little hard to follow at first but after the first few chapters you definitely do grow into it and at the end you realize why that sort of format works.

Jule is an interesting character, to say the least. She’s clever and strong, too emotional while somehow also simultaneously emotionally detached. She’s running away, but we don’t find out until the end–or rather, the beginning–exactly what she’s running from. Her relationship with Imogen, a jasmine-perfumed it girl, is also interesting. The pair are close friends, two girls who are both seemingly perfect but broken in ways only the other can understand. How exactly Imogen fits into Jule’s story…well, you’ll see.

The odd combinations of elements–an affinity for Victorian novels, several unexpected murders, locations like Mexico, Martha’s Vineyard, and London, various characters that pop up, and Jule’s obsession with being a modern day James Bond-like femme fatale superhero lady (what a mouthful)–all somehow work together. That being said, the real driving forces of this novel are the characters, of which there are many, all of whom are complex in ways you won’t see until the novel digs deeper.

The social commentary embedded in this novel’s sharp prose is also smart, providing a peek into the lives of Martha’s Vineyard-dwelling rich kids as well as themes like feminism, friendship, poverty, relationships and love, and coping with familial and mental issues.

Anyway, that’s all I’ll say so as to avoid the ending for you. 😉

All in all: If you’re look for an exciting, suspenseful, and more than slightly creepy read complete with an interesting antihero(ine), this one’s the book for you! Find it at your nearest bookshelf this September!

❤ Yasimone

Advertisements

Book Review (ARC) || The Sun is Also a Star

Author: Nicola Yoon

Publishing Company: Delacorte Press

Release Year: (ARC) To be published November 1, 2016

Genre(s): YA, realistic fiction

(Shout out to the Barnes and Noble B-Fest, where I won this ARC!)


My Synopsis

Natasha lives in New York City. Her family is Jamaican. She is cynical and practical. And she’s got a problem–her family is twelve hours away from being deported back to Jamaica. A place she remembers through fuzzy childhood memories. To be clear: She definitely doesn’t believe in fate, but it will take nothing short of a miracle for her to find  a way to stay in America, where she belongs.

Daniel lives in New York City too. His family is Korean. He is poetic and sentimental. He’s also got a problem–he has to apply to Yale and be the Good Son™ his parents want and become a doctor. But that’s not at all what he wants. To be clear: He definitely does believes in fate, and it is not in his to follow his parents’ dreams for him.

the sun is also a star.jpg
Did I mention I’m a sucker for pretty covers?

Now, under any other circumstances, they never would have met. If Natasha hadn’t been listening to music while walking away from the immigration services building and almost gotten run over, and if Daniel hadn’t skipped his college interview and been there to save her, their paths would never have crossed. But it’s funny how life works. What ensues is a journey across New York, and over the course of one day, two teenagers that began as complete and total strangers get to know each other and share in each other’s pain and happiness. And as unlikely as it seem, they each learn from each other from their differences and unexpectedly fall in love. Love at first sight is a tricky business, however. Natasha is still about to be deported. Daniel still messes things up. Will this sudden, beautiful spark burn on or fizzle out from unfortunate futures?

My Thoughts

The Sun is Also a Star absolutely blew my mind. ❤

I’m going to organise this review bit differently because if I don’t, this post will end up being a flailing mess. 😉

Writing Style

Nicola Yoon definitely writes from her heart and it really shows! I found the writing in this book to be so touching; just like the characters, it’s ever-changing. It’s a bit of soft, poetic narration that makes you feel fluttery mixed with logical philosophy and hard facts, all penned in with descriptive chapters that shake you to the core. I absolutely loved it and there were so many quote-able moments.

Format

Okay, we need to talk about how this book was set up. This book is written in multiple point-of-views, with Natasha and Daniel as the main narrators. However, some chapters are written through the perspective of side characters that briefly enter the story, while other chapters are written like the omniscient universe’s explanation of history, of fate, of incidents. It’s kind of limitless perspective that describe backstories that all connect. It’s a different reading experience but one that I thoroughly enjoyed!

Characters + Relationships

Natasha and Daniel were amazing characters! At the end of this book I almost felt as though they were real people I knew, albeit distantly. They’re both so flawed and so real, just two teens who (rather fittingly) fall in love too fast in the fastest-paced city in the work: New York City.

I generally tend not to be the biggest fan of instalove–it mostly feels too contrived to me–but this was one of the rare instances in which I was all for it. While Natasha and Daniel only knew each other for a day, the way their relationship progressed was so natural! Their dynamic was so interesting to follow along. Natasha, guarded, realist, and strictly scientific versus Daniel, an open book who tended to romanticise everything. Reading their  character development and watching the two teach and balance each other out, especially as they got closer, was deeply satisfying.

Thematic Elements

The Sun is Also a Star explores themes like fate, logos versus pathos, multiverses, the theory that all things happen for a reason, rebelling against what other people want for you versus what you want, family issues, and even some scientific knowledge smudged in. (Not to mention the whole immigration issue that Natasha was experiencing, in which she was being deported to a home she didn’t know and the bureaucracy did nothing to help.) This wasn’t a fast, fluffy romance; it wanted you to sit down and think about these things, which I respected a ton.

Another aspect I really appreciated was the racial diversity and addressing of the trials of each group. Not only were Natasha and Daniel aware of their cultures, their families were also introduced and their histories and dreams and familial struggles told. As Yoon herself is Jamaican-American and her husband Korean-America, you could tell that a lot of love and had been put into these characters and their cultures. So so so nice to see books like this. ❤

All in all: The Sun is Also a Star made me feel all the feelings. You need to get your hands on this book once it’s out. If you’re looking for a smart, dazzling romance that will leave you reeling with an overflowing heart when you’re done, this is the one!

❤ Yasimone

(Boy, this was a long review!) (Also, I’ve noticed I’ve gotten some new followers! Welcome, you guys!)

Book Haul || B-Fest Goodies

Hello again!

As I mentioned in my last post, I was at Barnes & Noble yesterday for the very first B-Fest. 😃 I decided to partake in a YA trivia game that was going on–just for fun–and the prize happened to be something I found quite appealing: a tote bag filled with books and sneak peek excerpts! I ended up winning the competition (yay!) and receiving the bag. (And if I clutched it to my chest and jumped around in the middle of the store, no one needs to know.)

The contents were definitely very satisfying, and I’m still very excited about them, so here’s a book haul! Incidentally, this appears to my very first book haul in the year and a half I’ve been blogging, so if you want any more of these sort of posts, please do let me know! 😊

book haul

b-fest.jpg

Everything in the photo above includes:

  • The Sun is Also a Star, Nicole Yoon – This one is an Advance Reading Copy and will be published in November of this year! It also happens to be my first ARC, so I’ll be reviewing it sometime in the upcoming weeks. I really enjoyed Everything, Everything and I hope Nicole Yoon’s new book will have that same magic.
  • The Hawkweed Prophecy, by Irena Brignull – Another ARC, this one being published in September. I am really intrigued by the synopsis of this novel, so I’m quite excited to read and review it.
  • An Ember in the Ashes, by Sabaa Tahir – I’ve heard a lot of wonderful things about Sabaa Tahir’s novels, and again, I can’t wait to be immersed in this world of sultry danger and fights for freedom.
  • Color Me Creative, by Kristina Webb – This one is a unique colouring and drawing book that I will be curling up with and scribbling on on a rainy afternoon very soon. 😄

b-fest book stack.jpg

And, besides that, I also received a couple of sneak peek excerpt pamphlets of The Fever Code by James Dashner (a prequel to The Maze Runner series which will be published later this year!) and Tales of the Peculiar by Ransom Riggs, which appears to be a whimsical and heavy novel, just as Riggs’s Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series was. Also included was a magazine and preview feature of upcoming YA novels from everyone’s favourite Epic Reads.

the fever code.jpgtales of the peculiar.jpg


I hope you all have a great weekend, and I’ll be back tomorrow with a post about today’s B-Fest author meetings!

❤ Yasimone